Archive for the 'Guest Post' Category

Statins and Heart Failure

Statins and Heart Failure Stephanie Seneff A paper titled simply “Lovastatin decreases coenzyme Q levels in humans” [16] states unequivocally in the abstract: “It is established that Coenzyme Q10 is indispensable for cardiac function.” The heart is a muscle, and hence it is subject to all the same laws of physics as the skeletal muscles. […]

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Statins and Myoglobin: How Muscle Pain and Weakness Progress to Heart, Lung and Kidney Failure

Well for my own part, I’m busy trying to move into a new place by July 1, so I’m a little bit busy, I’m not whining and I don’t think it will be a problem.  Actually, I don’t want to discuss it, just think its time for a change.  You may get disgusted, start thinking […]

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Vitamin C and Cardiovascular Disease

A Personal Viewpoint by Alan Spencer and Andrew W. Saul Orthomolecular Medicine News Service, June 22, 2010 (OMNS, June 22, 2010) Linus Pauling was aware that studies of the animal kingdom showed that most animals have the ability to manufacture vitamin C in their bodies. Humans cannot. Furthermore, on average, mammals make 5,400mg daily when […]

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Vitamin D and Musculoskeletal Pain: Part I

A few months back I came across a fascinating and important document.  I was so impressed with the work that I contacted its author, Dr. Stewart Leavitt, PhD and asked him if he cared to be interviewed on the subject on the Skeptic’s Health Journal Club, to which he graciously obliged.  Previously I had not […]

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Health Benefits of the Mediterranean Diet

Today we have a guest post by Dr. Steve Parker, author of  “The Advanced Mediterranean Diet: Lose Weight, Feel Better, Live Longer.”  If you boil down half of what I am saying on this blog, it probably boils down to drink clean water and eat good food.  It is becoming more clear and more documented […]

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Vaccines, Autism, and the Precautionary Principle

I am honored to present a guest post by professor of Chemistry Emeritus, Dr. Philip Rudnick, PhD, on the issue of autism and vaccination as well as a timely reminder of the responsibility of physicians and other healthcare providers to first make every effort to avoid worsening a patient’s condition or causing any direct harm. 

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An Introduction to the Mediterran Diet

This is a post that I am very exited about.  Back when I broke my hand a few weeks back I was still able to do a little correspondence through a combination of left handed typing and voice recognition technology.  One of the people I was in touch with was Dr. Steve Parker, MD and […]

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Statins, Pregnancy, Sepsis, Cancer, Heart Failure: a Critical Analysis: Part II

Part two of a series on statins and cholesterol by Dr. Stephanie Seneff. 4. Do Statins Protect against Sepsis?  Quite surprisingly, you can easily find web pages that hail the benefits of statins beyond their ability to lower cholesterol (already a dubious achievement). The claims they make directly contradict the actual effects of statins. For […]

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Statins, Pregnancy, Sepsis, Cancer, Heart Failure: a Critical Analysis: Part I

This is the first in a series of guest posts by Dr. Stephanie Seneff on the topic of cholesterol lowering statin drugs.  Dr. Seneff is a Principal Research Scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.  Her current research interests encompass many aspects of the development of computer conversational systems, including speech recognition, probabilistic natural language […]

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The Wonder of Cholesterol

This post today is, at last, the first post that starts to get at the vision I had when starting this site, namely that of outside experts giving us some insight into and understanding of their work.  Today’s guest post is by Mr. Glyn Wainwright.  Mr. Wainwright is a scientific polyglot as it were with […]

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